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Regularly Scheduled Events

IN ADDITION TO ONGOING CLASSES AND WORKSHOPS, SHOESTRING STUDIO HOSTS TWO WEEKLY COMMUNITY SESSIONS WITH THE FIGURE MODEL. THESE SESSIONS ARE ALWAYS DROP-IN, WITH NO INSTRUCTION COMPONENT, AND OPEN TO MEMBERS AND NON-MEMBERS ALIKE. MEMBERS PAY $10, NON-MEMBERS PAY $15, OR $10 WITH A FRIEND.

Wednesday evening Drink-n-Draw, every Wednesday, 6:30-9pm. $15/ $10

Join us for a rotating cast of professional figure models, hailing from backgrounds as diverse as dance, yoga, burlesque and drag. Poses build exponentially from dynamic two-minute gestures to twenty minutes in length. Easels and chairs are available, drawing supplies are on hand; although we encourage you to bring your own favorite materials, the beer is cold and the camaraderie is warm. Characteristic of a tradition started in years prior, we fire up the crock pot beforehand and invite the attendees to stay for a potluck supper to follow.

Sunday afternoon Long Pose Lab, every Sunday, 4-7pm. $15/ $10

We’ve added a second section to our popular weekly figure drawing group. Sundays will be dedicated to long-format poses, with one pose for the entire session. All mediums of painting are welcome, as well as draftsmen focusing on developed drawings. Attendees are encouraged to bring their own supplies. There will be opportunities to work with costumes and environment in the poses.

Monthly Sunday Evening Critique Night, First Sunday of each month, 7-9pm, FREE

Alexis Neider hosts Critique Night, the first Sunday of every month (check our calendar for alterations in the schedule due to holiday weekends). Bring finished works or works in progress, artworks are discussed by the group on a first come basis, with a sign up at the door. Artists are encouraged to formulate a question for the group they wish to be discussed in the course of the critique. 

The Brooklyn Draw Jam! First Monday of each month, 7-10pm, $5 Suggested Donation

The Brooklyn Draw Jam is a little different from your average drink and draw. Artists of any skill level can come draw whatever they want and hang out in a relaxed atmosphere. Jammers engage in spontaneous collaborative drawings like jam comics, exquisite corpses, and drawing games. Regulars include Jess WorbyJason DasBrian Elig, and more. Cartoonists and illustrators are welcome to bring their own work as well.

 

Upcoming Events

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Madeleine Boucher, "Future Maps/ Past Maps"

Madeleine Boucher, "Future Maps/ Past Maps"

Map and Territory: new work by Madeleine Boucher, Robynne Heymans, Jacqui LeBoutillier, and Sarah Toth

Opening March 24, 2017, 7-11pm, at Shoestring Studio

Shoestring Studio is proud to present an exhibition of maps, charting both imagined space and fragmented, distorted real geography. 

Privatize the Dream: Project Statement

To us grandchildren of the moon landing, who grew up with dreams of becoming astronauts, the new wave of privately financed space travel is both thrilling and troubling. When riding a rocket becomes an experience you can pay for rather than an honor earned through virtue, will we dream of wealth in place of excellence? Will we still imagine of ourselves as a community joined to aim at the stars? Taking the form of a quilt of hand-dyed, printed, and painted felt, Privatize the Dream draws on legends of the space race, the snuggly tangibility of warm and welcoming sheets, and the anxieties of nationalism, charismatic capitalism, and the lure of the void to provoke a layered reflection on the future of our aspirations and the nation we’ve imagined ourselves to be. What happens when we sell the stuff of our dreams? 

The Forgotten Borough: Project Statement

"This data-driven process reduces the site to a mound of little facts that say almost nothing about the character, mood, or quality of the site."

—Thomas Rainer and Claudia West. “Planting in a Post-Wild World.” 2015

Maps can be misleading and overly reductive, particularly when it comes to mapping cities. This series tests that assumption by compiling publicly available geospatial data into a collection of dense maps, drawings, and models, in the hope of revealing urban complexity. Illegible, and often hardly recognizable, the results question the limits of mapping and data, leading to the conclusion that viewing data at a single projection or scale cannot truly reveal the character or complexity of the place. Staten Island, “The Forgotten Borough,” is a prime example of how reliance on planar representation can distort how community, ecology, and infrastructure interact on the ground.